I Film de Fernando Di Leo

Films of Fernando Di Leo

A list of films directed by Fernando Di Leo:

Gli eroi di ieri… oggi… e domani (1964)
Rose rosse per il führer (it) (Red Roses for the Führer, 1968)
I ragazzi del massacro (Naked Violence, 1969)
Brucia, ragazzo, brucia (A Woman on Fire, 1969)
Amarsi male (A Wrong Way to Love, 1969)
Slaughter Hotel, also known as The Beast Kills in Cold Blood, 1971)
Milano calibro 9 (Caliber 9, 1972)
La mala ordina (Manhunt, 1972)
Il Boss (The Boss, 1973)
La seduzione (Seduction, 1973)
Il poliziotto è marcio (Shoot First, Die Later, 1974)
Colpo in canna (Loaded Guns, 1975)
La città sconvolta: caccia spietata ai rapitori (Kidnap Syndicate, 1975)
Gli amici di Nick Hezard (Nick the Sting, 1976)
I padroni della città (Rulers of the City, also known as Mister Scarface, 1976)
Diamanti sporchi di sangue (Blood and Diamonds, 1977)
Avere vent’anni (To Be Twenty, 1978)
Vacanze per un massacro (Madness, 1980)
Razza violenta (The Violent Breed, 1984)
Killer Contro Killers (Killer Vs Killers, 1985)

Henri Matisse, Still Life with Goldfish (1912)

Henri Matisse’s use of bold, brilliant color, varied textures, and tranquil scenes has captured the minds of many art appreciators for decades. During certain periods in his life he was drawn to one subject over another, and one of these fascinations developed while on a trip to Morocco, where he encountered the populace daydreaming by bowls of goldfish.

This led to a fascination with the idea of contemplation, and it showed up in a total of nine of his works, some painted years after his time spent in Morocco. This particular painting, Still Life with Goldfish, was completed in 1912, and continued his search for a way to invite his audience into a relaxed state, much like the Moroccans experienced with their goldfish encased in glass.

That yearning for quiet tranquility, paired with the bright, sometimes crowded interiors so prevalent in his work make Matisse an artist worth studying. One could spend months on a single painting and still have more to explore. If you ever get the chance, you can see some of his paintings up close and personal at the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

If you’d like to learn more about this specific painting, there is an excellent, in depth write up by Charlotte Wilkins for Khan Academy in the Modern and Contemporary Art section. If you’d like to learn more about the artist, you can read more on Henri Matisse here.

Henri Matisse, Still Life with Goldfish (1912)

How Movie Producers Make Money

How to make money as a movie producer, in case you ever wanted to know …

Producer is one of the “big” roles when it comes to making a film, but unlike directors, actors, sound men, camera people, and editors, the role of producer isn’t one everyone understands well … or even knows anything about.

Put simply, the producer is a person who pays to make the film, and then sells it to make money. Of course, unless the producer is going to fund the film themselves, they have to get investors. That’s one side of things: The producer makes sure the movie can get completed by meeting the $ needs.

Then, once the movie is made, the producer can sell the film (in various ways) to make money. If the producer makes more money selling the movie than they spent making it, they turn a profit.

(Wait a second, there are other ways a producer can make money, such as brand endorsements! Yeah, well there are, but I’m not going to describe those here).

Let’s look at 3 ways a producer can make money:

1) Sell the film directly to area distributors. For example, “The Silence Under the Mountain” (a movie we just made up to use as an example here) was made for $2 million. Skeeter

Does this really happen to directors?
Does this really happen to directors?

Jones, the producer, then sold it to a big distributor for $5 million and he sold the satellite rights to Sat-Vision for another $1 million. He made $4 million in profit.

2) Make a deal with distributors to pay a percentage of what they make off the film. The producer, Jones, considered making a deal with PercentaWorks for 10% of their overall collection when they distributed the film.

3) The producer distributes it himself. Jones also considered taking on the role of distributor, meaning he wouldn’t sell the film to a distributor and give them anything. Instead, he would have called theater exhibitors and had them buy or lease “Silence.”